PyDev of the Week: Ivelin Demirov

This week, we welcome Ivelin Demirov as our PyDev of the Week. Ivelin is the author of Learn Javascript Visually and has recently completed a successful Kickstarter for his next book, Learn Python Visually. Let’s spend some time getting to know Ivelin!

ivelin-demirov

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

Back in 1989 I started a computer class that was organized by a local school.

It taught Assembler for the Z80. That was the moment when I understood I am more of a visual learner type of person.

I graduated as an industrial engineer in 2001. I liked creating new products, but I fell in love with graphics and web design. I spent the next 12 years working for different agencies, and eventually evolved to an Art Director. During that time I was working with programmers all the time, and I was curious about what they were doing and even tried to write some code myself, but me being a visual person it was really hard to stay focused on a boring black and white screen filled with code.

Why did you start using Python?

While I was working on a website and sending back and forward instructions to programmers in my department, I had times I was so frustrated with the results and the time needed to complete a piece of script that I wanted to sit down and write it myself. I knew I needed to start slow because I’ve tried it before and it didn’t work out very well. A friend from the development department suggested I start with Python, it being the easiest language that forces you to write clean code.

What other programming languages do you know and which is your favorite?

As my focus was web development at the time, I started with HTML, CSS and JavaScript

Then tried Ruby, PHP and C++. JavaScript is my favorite along with the new Swift language by Apple.

What projects are you working on now?

Right now I am working on an interactive ebook that teaches Python using metaphors, real life objects analogies and simple drag and drop exercises.

Which Python libraries are your favorite (core or 3rd party)?

Probably pyGame, it’s so much fun!


What made you decide to write a book about Python?

Since I wrote my first book on JavaScript, many people started asking if I could write a Python book in the same style.

Can you tell us what differentiates your Python book from others?

I read a lot of books on psychology and I know that there are 3 main types of learning styles: auditory, visual, and kinesthetic. My book focuses on the visual type.

Most of the Python or any programming language books are written by professional programmers with years of experience. Those authors have developed an excellent logic and understanding of the principles that they feel so natural to them and so it’s hard to explain to someone that is non-tech savvy and that wasn’t very good with math at school.

Is there anything else you’d like to say?

If you find yourself struggling to learn to code, don’t give up, just look for alternative learning methods or better yet, create them yourself. You will learn in the process and then help thousands others who feel the same way as you.

Thank you!

The Last 10 PyDevs of the Week

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