Python 101, the book I am authoring is nearly finished. I had a couple of “proof” copies produced by Lulu to verify things were laying out correctly and to help me find mistakes. Seeing it in print is pretty cool. It also made some oversights pretty obvious, although they’re all cosmetic in nature.

Anyway, right now I am just going through the book and doing some final edits. I also have an appendix to add and I am currently waiting for two more illustrations to be finished. The book is still scheduled to launch in June, 2014. You can actually pre-order the ebook now. I will add a link to the softcover when it’s ready for purchase, probably sometime during the first week of June.

Here’s a fun sneak peak of one of the next pieces of art:


This contest is over!


Packt Publishing has partnered with my blog to give away 2 copies of their ebook version of Mastering Object-oriented Python by Steven Lott. You can read my full book review here, but frankly, I thought it was one of best advanced Python books I’ve read in a long time. It’s also based around Python 3, although most of the concepts will work with Python 2.

How You Can Win

To win your copy of this book, all you need to do is come up with a comment below highlighting the reason “why you would like to win this book”.

Duration of the contest & selection of winners

The contest is valid for 2 weeks, and is open to everyone. Winners will be selected on the basis of their comment posted. The contest will close on 05/26/2014 at 1 p.m. CST.

Packt Publishing asked me to be a technical reviewer for one of their latest Python books, Mastering Object-Oriented Python by Steven Lott. This book is a sequel of sorts to their 2010 release, Python 3 Object Oriented Programming by Dusty Phillips, which I reviewed here.

Note: This book is explicitly for Python 3 developers and does NOT talk about Python 2 much at all.

Quick Review

  • Why I picked it up: I was asked by the publisher to be a part of editing the book, however this is just the sort of book I like to read
  • Why I finished it: It’s quite well written and you learn a lot about how the internals of classes work
  • I’d give it to: An intermediate Python programmer who wants to learn new things


Kivy is a neat package that allows Python developers to create user interfaces on mobile devices. You can also deploy the applications to desktops too. This is the second book I’ve seen put out on the subject. The first book, Kivy – Interactive Applications in Python by Roberto Ulloa came out last year from Packt Publishing. This year, we have Dusty Phillips’ work, Creating Apps in Kivy from O’Reilly. I will be reviewing the PDF version of the book.

Quick Review

  • Why I picked it up:I picked this book up because I like the author’s previous work, Python 3 Object Oriented Programming
  • Why I finished it: The book is pretty short and it’s interesting
  • I’d give it to: Someone who already knows Python


I just wanted to drop a quick note that the Python 101 book is now available for Pre-order here. Currently you will receive the draft versions of the book as they become available. Right now, Parts I and II have been released which amounts to approx. 115 pages of content.


You can read more about the book below: (more…)

The Python 101 book campaign finished today. I am now well funded to create the book and get all the artwork done. I think I may try to get additional illustrations too. While we didn’t hit the next stretch goal, I plan to go ahead and work on screencasts anyway. As I mentioned previously, I most likely won’t start on those until after I’ve finished writing the book. I have received lots of positive comments about the book so far and I hope to put out a product that you will find useful.

I will be sending out Part I as soon as I can after Kickstarter transfers the funds. You will receive a survey asking for your email address. I will probably be sending a survey out to those who bought t-shirts and such too.

Thanks a lot for all your support. I am very grateful.

There are under 2 days left in the book campaign! I think that’s pretty exciting. I hope you do too!

I’ve been busy writing the new Part 3 lately. I only have two more chapters to go before it’s done. My hope is that Part 3 will be done by the end of the week.

I have also come up with a fun little script that can put my book together for me. Today it dawned on me that this little program would be a good illustration for my readers about how to tackle a project and break it into more manageable pieces. So I’ll be adding a chapter or two somewhere in the book about that as some of my backers have already mentioned that they would like to know how to do this sort of thing.

Thanks for your support!

We only have five more days before the end of the campaign, so I thought it would be nice to share a couple chapters from the book. You can download the introduction along with chapters 1 and 2 here.

I have been working on the new section of the book since it is now the new Part III. It is coming along pretty well. My illustrator has been busy creating some new art for the book. I’ll be sharing that soon.

Thanks a lot for your support and have a great weekend!

There’s a Python book contest going on over on the Bite Sized Python Tips blog. You can get one of 3 copies of the book Tkinter GUI Application Development by Bhaskar Chaudhary. I reviewed this book late last year and found it be a really interesting book. I think it will give you lots of good ideas to try in developing your own GUI applications. Now’s your chance to get a copy of this neat book!

This is an update on the Kickstarter campaign I am running in support of my Python 101 book:

We made it halfway through the campaign and I think we’re going to reach our first stretch goal! Speaking of stretch goals, I was thinking I should go ahead and announce a couple more.

Stretch Goal #2: 1500 backers

If we can reach 1500 backers, then I’m going to create some companion screencasts to go with the book. These screencasts wouldn’t be done in time to launch with the book and probably won’t cover every single chapter, so I would just release them during the summer and fill in the blanks according to the feedback I receive. Also I plan to release the screencasts for anyone, probably by publishing them on Youtube.

On the topic of licensing

I mentioned in my last update that I was thinking about doing a website version of the book and attaching a Creative Commons license to it. I didn’t get a lot of feedback from that, but of the few that did respond, there seems to be more who think I should give the book away for free. By turning the book into a website, I suspect that the number of people who will purchase the book will drop significantly. So we’ll make this into a special two-fold stretch goal:

Stretch Goal #3 – $25,000 or 2500 backers

If we reach $25k in funding or 2500 backers, then I’ll release the book as a website, but with a copyright. If we get significantly higher than that, then I will consider releasing the website contents under Creative Commons instead.

In the mean time, I ask you to tell your friends, classmates and colleagues about this Kickstarter. The more we spread the word, the more likely we are to reach the stretch goals!

P.S. I am finishing up the last half of the last chapter of Part II. Hopefully Part II will be completely roughed out by the end of day or early tomorrow.

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