Education


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My latest project is turning my book, Python 101, into a Screencast. I have started a Kickstarter to raise funds to help in this endeavor. You can check it out here:

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/34257246/the-python-101-screencast

The basic idea is to take each chapter of the book and turn it into a screencast. There are 44 chapters currently that will be turned into mini-videos. I’ve already realized I can add a lot of other items in a screencast that are easier to show than to write about, so there will definitely be additional content. I hope you will join me in this project.

Thanks,
Mike

I am currently working on another Kickstarter campaign to turn my book, Python 101 into a video series. I am planning on launching this project on Wednesday, March 25th. There are 44 chapters in my book, so I’ll be creating a minimum of 44 screencast videos. Here is what is currently covered in the book and what will also be covered in the video series:

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Yesterday I posted about PyImageSearch Gurus computer vision Kickstarter and then I came across another semi-related Kickstarter. This one is for Machine vision with Python using an OpenMV Cam. It uses MicroPython (Python for microcontrollers) to control a camera on a circuit board. This project can be used with an Arduino, mbed or other microcontroller over I2C, Serial, or SPI protocols. I believe the Raspberry Pi falls into one or more of the latter categories.

They haven’t reached their goal yet, but they have almost a month left to raise the funds. You can check our their project here.

I’ve actually never heard of this guy, but the fellow behind the pyimagesearch blog has created a Kickstarter for a computer vision subscription course. His name is Adrian Rosebrock and his Kickstarter was funded in 25 minutes! His course covers a lot of different topics in computer vision and sounds really interesting. You should definitely check it out, especially if you’re in this field.

This week we welcome Dr. Margherita DI LEO as our PyDev of the Week. She is our first PyLady in this series! Let’s spend some time getting to know her!

madi
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This week we have Mariano Reingart as our PyDev of the Week. Mariano co-authored the web2py Application Development Cookbook for Packt Publishing and has recently done a partial port of wxQt for wxPython. Let’s spend some time with Mariano to see what he has to say!

 

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I have decided to run a sale on my book, Python 101 until the end of the year. From now until January 1st, you can get my book for 50% off if you use the following offer code: xmas2014

Just go to https://gumroad.com/products/bppWr and enter the offer code on checkout.

Happy holidays!

Code Condo recently named this blog, Mouse Vs Python, as one of the “11 Must-Read Blogs for Python Developers”. The article is worth a read as it lists a number of other really good websites, such as pydanny’s and Doug Hellman’s. I really enjoyed Effbot’s when I was learning Python, however I don’t think Mr. Lundh keeps it updated any more, so I’m not sure how I feel about that one. Anyway, be sure to check the article out if you need some ideas for what other Python blogs to read.

My first book, Python 101 has been published today. You can buy it directly from my blog which will get you a PDF, EPUB and MOBI version of the book. You can also purchase a softcover edition of the book via Lulu. Finally, I have published the eBook to Amazon.

If you happen to run a Python or technology blog and would be interested in reviewing my book, Python 101, please feel free to contact me with your blog’s information. I am looking for a few good bloggers to review the book.

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Order Now

Here’s some more information about the book:

Part One

The first part is the beginner section. In it you will learn all the basics of Python. From Python types (strings, lists, dictionaries) to conditional statements to loops. You will also learn about comprehensions, functions and classes and everything in between! Note: This section has been completed and is in the editing phase.

Part Two

This section will be a curated tour of the Python Standard Library. The intent isn’t to cover everything in it, but instead it is to show the reader that you can do a lot with Python right out of the box. We’ll be covering the modules I find the most useful in day-to-day programming tasks, such as os, sys, logging, threads, and more.

Part Three

This section covers mostly intermediate level material. Here are the topics covered:

  • lambda
  • decorators
  • properties
  • debugging
  • testing
  • profiling

Part Four

Now things get really interesting! In part three, we will be learning how to install 3rd party libraries (i.e. packages) from the Python Package Index and other locations. We will cover easy_install and pip. This section will also be a series of tutorials where you will learn how to use the packages you download. For example, you will learn how to download a file, parse XML, use an Object Relational Mapper to work with a database, etc.

Part Five

The last section of the book will cover how to share your code with your friends and the world! You will learn how to package it up and share it on the Python Package Index (i.e. how to create an egg or wheel). You will also learn how to create executables using py2exe, bb_freeze, cx_freeze and PyInstaller. Finally you will learn how to create an installer using Inno Setup.

Writing Style

This book will be written using my original blogging style. This means that the chapters will be shorter than your usual programming textbook. Most chapters will most likely be less than 10 pages! The idea here is to get the reader up to speed on the subject, not to beat them over the head with it.
Who should read this book?

This book is for beginners, but I believe people with intermediate skills will also find its contents valuable.

Packt Publishing asked me to be a technical reviewer for one of their latest Python books, Mastering Object-Oriented Python by Steven Lott. This book is a sequel of sorts to their 2010 release, Python 3 Object Oriented Programming by Dusty Phillips, which I reviewed here.

Note: This book is explicitly for Python 3 developers and does NOT talk about Python 2 much at all.


Quick Review

  • Why I picked it up: I was asked by the publisher to be a part of editing the book, however this is just the sort of book I like to read
  • Why I finished it: It’s quite well written and you learn a lot about how the internals of classes work
  • I’d give it to: An intermediate Python programmer who wants to learn new things

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