Education


I first heard about Blaze from NumPy’s original developer’s blog back in December 2012. A few days ago, InformationWeek announced that DARPA was funding the project to the tune of $3 million dollars to get some big data libraries written for Python. There will be two new projects, Blaze and Bokeh. Blaze will be an extension of NumPy and SciPy and make those libraries big data friendly. The Bokeh project will be for big data visualization.

Blaze will be open source. You can read more about it here. I was unable to find a specific link to the Bokeh project.

Python provides a very powerful logging library in its standard library. A lot of programmers use print statements for debugging (myself included), but you can also use logging to do this. It’s actually cleaner to use logging as you won’t have to go through all your code to remove the print statements. In this tutorial we’ll cover the following topics:

  • Creating a simple logger
  • How to log from multiple modules
  • Log formatting
  • Log configuration

By the end of this tutorial, you should be able to confidently create your own logs for your applications. Let’s get started! (more…)

SQLite is a self-contained, server-less, config-free transactional SQL database engine. Python gained the sqlite3 module all the way back in version 2.5 which means that you can create SQLite database with any current Python without downloading any additional dependencies. Mozilla uses SQLite databases for its popular Firefox browser to store bookmarks and other various pieces of information. In this article you will learn the following:

  • How to create a SQLite database
  • How to insert data into a table
  • How to edit the data
  • How to delete the data
  • Basic SQL queries

This article will be similar in function to the recent SQLAlchemy tutorial that appeared on this site earlier this month. If you want to inspect your database visually, you can use the SQLite Manager plugin for Firefox or if you like the command line, you can use SQLite’s command line shell (more…)

This blog ran an article about wxPython, SQLAlchemy, CRUD and MVC earlier this month. The program that we created in that post was dubbed “MediaLocker”, whether or not it was explicitly stated as such. Anyway, since then, I have received a couple comments about improving the program. One came from Michael Bayer, one of the creative minds behind SQLAlchemy itself and the other comments came from Werner Bruhin, a nice guy who haunts the wxPython mailing list, helping new users. So I went about creating an improved version of the code following their advice. Werner then improved it a bit more. So in this article, we will be looking at improving the code, first with my example and then with his. Enough talk though; let’s get to the meat of story! (more…)

In this article, we will be creating a program to store our personal books or perhaps just the books you’ve read. It will demonstrate how to combine wxPython and SqlAlchemy, a SQL Object Relational Mapper (ORM). This program will also give you an introduction to the model-view-controller (MVC) and “create, read, update and destroy” (CRUD) methodologies. The aim is to show you how to create an application that can do the following:

  • Create a database (create)
  • Add records to that database (sort of create)
  • Display the records (read and view)
  • Modify records (update)
  • Delete records (destroy)

The order of this tutorial will follow MVC, so we will start with the model. The model is the basis for the GUI (the View) anyway, so it’s a good place to start. (more…)

It’s been a while since I have done any interesting Python links. I quit for a while because these things take a while to put together and few seemed interested, but I’ll give it another go. This week has a really interesting article on Python and robots. Jesse Noller has a fun article where he collects various Python stories too (I nabbed a couple of his picks for mine too because he was right: they are interesting!)

If you think I missed something awesome that happened in the Python world recently, let me know in the comments and maybe I’ll add it next time. Thanks for your support!

As PyCon approaches, the blogger community was invited to interview the speakers that are coming to the event. I chose Wesley Chun, writer of Core Python Programming and co-author of Python Web Development with Django. In this interview, I ask Wesley about his talk, Running Django Apps on Google App Engine and about PyCon in general. Let’s see what he has to say: (more…)

This weekly edition of Python News has quite the variety of topics. You can learn about how to create passwords, the new Enthought Python Distribution and about something called pylibftdi. Plus, I’ve added a section just for PyCon related stuff since they seem to be releasing a lot of info this month. For example, there’s an interview with Armin Ronacher (author of Flask) in that section.

PyCon News

So far no one has ever given me any leads for my next article, so that either means I’m doing something right or no one’s reading these posts. Well, as always, I will take a look at any links that my kind readers give me.

It’s time for your weekly dose of Python news. What happened in the last week? Or what did I find that I thought was newsy? Lots of stuff, it turns out. This week, you can learn about the controversy of PyPI, Tablib, a “fireside” chat with Python’s founder that’s coming up next month at PyCon USA and more.

I hope you find a few of those links useful or interesting. Feel free to give me a few for next week in the comments!

It’s almost the end of January already and PyCon USA 2011 is just around the corner. In this edition, we cover a wide variety of topics, from Python 2.7 – 3.x. We’ve got sprints, new books, web-related projects and good old recursion articles. Come one, come all! Read the news of the week!

On the PyCon front, you should take note the Early Bird pricing is now over. Why did you wait? Fortunately, they are still selling tickets, so stop stalling and just come! The PyCon blog also mentions that they’re still looking for sponsors, so if you or someone you know has that kind of cashola, point them in that direction.

And now we return you back to your regularly scheduled blog reading…

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