PyCon


If you’re like me, you missed PyCon North America 2014 this year. It happened last weekend. While the main conference days are over, the code sprints are still running. Anyway, for those of you who missed PyCon, they have released a bunch of videos on pyvideo! Every year, they seem to get the videos out faster than the last. I think that’s pretty awesome myself. I’m looking forward to watching a few of these so I can see what I missed.

Not sure how I missed this, but PyCon 2013 is already open for proposals, which means if you like to talk about Python, now’s your chance to show your chops! You can propose a talk, a tutorial or a poster. Head on over to their prospectus for more information. PyCon is a lot of fun and a good place to go to expose yourself to new things in Python. You can learn a lot just in the hallway circuit, let alone the actual talks! Put your thinking caps on because they’re only accepting ideas until September 28th!

The PyCon USA talk videos are finally starting to come online. You can check them out here: http://pyvideo.org/category/17/pycon-us-2012. I’m wondering why they chose this over the miro site that they’ve been using for the last few years. Maybe someone in the know can comment on that.

I noticed the streams I linked to seemed to be pretty hit or miss, so hopefully this will work better for those of you who missed out on PyCon like I did. Enjoy!

For those of you who didn’t know, Convore is out and it looks like Disqus is in: https://pycon.disqus.com/

I thought Convore was pretty interesting last year, although there were some minor issues. I’ll be interested to hear what people think of the disqus system compared to convore though.

I saw on Twitter that you can watch a Livestream of PyCon here: http://streamti.me/

It seems to work and there’s even a Twitter feed along the bottom of the site. Check it out if you didn’t make it either!

In case you didn’t realize it, PyCon has officially started today in Santa Clara, CA. Sadly my organization was too slow footed to secure a ticket for me, so I won’t be there to report on what’s going on this year. Instead, I’ll try to post links to other people’s blogs so you can get an idea of what it’s like there. You can also follow along on Twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/pycon. Finally, the PyCon blog seems to be staying fairly up-to-date with fun announcements. Hopefully next year, I’ll be able to return to PyCon and give it some live coverage once again.

The 2012 Python Conference USA opened Registration today. The official announcement doesn’t mention it, but I’m pretty sure there’s an attendance cap on this conference too of 1500 just like last year. You should sign up early not only because of the limited attendance, but because there are “Early Bird” rates which are cheaper!

The complete schedule isn’t done yet, but you can whet your appetite by checking out the list of tutorials that were released last week.

I have enjoyed all the PyCons I’ve attended so far. They are a great place to learn new things, show others your talent, network with like-minded people and just relax too. This year, the conference will be in Santa Clara, California. If you can’t afford to go, they even offer Financial Assistance. So why are you waiting?

PyCon USA is looking for people to come and give talks, tutorials and poster sessions. So whether you are one of those people who just loves to talk or you’re more of a visual person, there’s a place for you. For the talkers, and I mean serious talkers, I would recommend the tutorial or regular talk sessions. If you’re not a talker or you want to get better, then you’d want to choose a 30-minute talk, a poster session or just get your feet wet with a lightning talk, the last of which you’d have to sign up for onsite.

Don’t know what to talk about? PyCon’s got your back. They wrote a whole article on the topic. There’s also an article on tutorial topics and a brand new article about the poster session. So if you don’t know what to talk about, those posts should get your creative juices flowing.

Regardless of what you choose, you only have until October 12th to get your submission in. What are you waiting for? Christmas? That’s too late! Get on this right now!

Note: If you just hate talking, join the PyCon organizers mailing list and help in some other way. It’s not tax deductible, but it might give you warm fuzzies.

PyCon 2012’s website just went live today. They already have a bunch of sponsors and information about the conference on the website. Of course, they haven’t done a call for speakers yet, so don’t expect to find a list of talks or tutorials for several months. However, the website itself looks pretty slick. You can read the full press release on the official PyCon blog. They are really hyping their diversity statement and code of conduct. I think those are pretty self-explanatory, so I’m not going to discuss them here. You can check them out yourself.

Now is the time to start thinking about whether or not you’d like to give a talk or tutorial at PyCon and start putting together your proposal(s). I’m sure this year will be pretty big, so there will probably be lots of submissions. What that means is that you need to go the extra mile to make yourself stand out from the crowd. Grab your thinking caps and start mulling!

You might even start talking PyCon up to your boss in hopes of getting them to send you there and sponsor the event. I’m sure that PyCon can always use another sponsor.

FYI: I am a PyCon fan, not a marketer. I have enjoyed going there the past few years and always hope that they do well.

PyCon 2011 (USA) is over. But a lot of people wrote articles about it. So in case you missed the action, you can check out a few of the articles about what happened. If you don’t see your favorite PyCon-related article here, let me know in the comments.

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