Category Archives: Python

Is related to the Python Programming language in some way

PyDev of the Week: Alessia Marcolini

This week we welcome Alessia Marcolini (@viperale) as our PyDev of the Week! Alessia is a Python blogger and speaker. You can check out some of her work over on Medium. You can also see some of her coding skills on Github. Let’s spend a few moments getting to know her better!

Alessia Marcolini

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

Hello everybody, my name is Alessia and I’m 21. I come from a little town near Verona, a beautiful city in the north of Italy.

I’ve been living in Trento (Italy) for 2 years and a half now. I moved here to attend university: I’m currently enrolled in the third year of a Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science.

In 2017 I started working part time as a Junior Research Assistant in the Bruno Kessler Foundation, too. FBK is a research foundation based in Trento, working on Science, Technology, and Social Sciences. I’m part of the MPBA unit which focuses on novel applications of Deep Learning from complex data: e.g. Precision Medicine, Imaging and Portable Spectroscopy in industry processes, Nowcasting on time-spatial data. I’m currently working on deep learning frameworks to integrate multiple medical imaging modalities and different clinical data to get more precise prognostic/diagnostic functions.

When not coding, I love dancing and listening to music. I have also been part of a hip hop crew until 2017. Continue reading PyDev of the Week: Alessia Marcolini

PyDev of the Week: Thomas Wouters

This week we welcome Thomas Wouters (@Yhg1s) as our PyDev of the Week! Thomas is a core developer of the Python language. He is very active in open source in general and has been a director of the Python Software Foundation in the past. Let’s spend some time getting to know him better!

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

I’m a self-taught programmer, a high school dropout, a core CPython developer, and a former PSF Board Director from Amsterdam, The Netherlands. I’ve been playing with computers for a long time, starting when my parents got a Commodore 64 with a couple books on BASIC, when I was 6 or 7. I learned a lot by just playing around on it. Then in 1994 I discovered the internet, while I was still in high school. This was before the days of the World Wide Web or (most) graphics, but I was sucked in by a programmable MUD, a text-based “adventure” environment, called LambdaMOO. LambdaMOO lets you create your own part of the world by making rooms and objects, and programming their behaviour, in a programming language that was similar to Python (albeit unrelated to it). One thing led to another and I dropped out of high school and got a job at a Dutch ISP (XS4ALL), doing tech support for customers. A year later I moved to the Sysadmin department, where I worked for ten years. I gradually moved from system administration to programming, even before I learned about Python.

 

Besides working with computers I also like playing computer games of all kinds, and non-computer games like board games or card games. I do kickboxing, and I have a bunch of lovely cats, about whom I sometimes tweet. I’m pretty active on IRC as well, and I’m a channel owner of #python on Freenode. I also keep ending up in administration-adjacent situations, like the PSF Board of Directors and the Python Steering Council, not so much because I like it but because I don’t mind doing it, I’m apparently not bad at it, and it’s important stuff that needs to be done well.

Continue reading PyDev of the Week: Thomas Wouters

PyDev of the Week: Sebastián Ramírez

This week we welcome Sebastián Ramírez (@tiangolo) as our PyDev of the Week! Sebastián is the creator of the FastAPI Python web framework. He maintains his own website/blog which you should check out if you have some free time. You can also see his open source projects there. You can also see what projects he is contributing to over on Github.

Let’s take a few moments to get to know Sebastián better!

Sebastián Ramírez

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):
Hey! I’m Sebastián Ramírez, I’m from Colombia, and currently living in Berlin, Germany.
I was “homeschooled” since I was a kid, there wasn’t even a term for that, it wasn’t common. I didn’t go to school nor university, I studied everything at home. At about (I think) 14 I started fiddling with video edition and visual effects, some music production, and then graphic design to help with my parent’s business.
Then I thought that building a website should be almost the same …soon I realized I had to learn some of those scary “programming languages”. HTML, CSS, and JavaScript (“but!!! HTML and CSS are not…” I know, I know). But soon I was able to write a very short text, in a text file, and use it to make a browser show a button, that when clicked would show a pop-up saying “Hello world!”… I was so proud and excited about it, I guess it was a huge “I maked these” moment for me. I still feel that rush, that excitement from time to time. That’s what makes me keep loving code.
I also like to play videogames and watch movies, but many times I end up just coding in my free time too. I’m boring like that… 😂

Continue reading PyDev of the Week: Sebastián Ramírez

Getting Jenkins Jobs by Build State with Python

I have been working with Python and Jenkins a lot lately and recently needed to find a way to check the job’s status at the build level. I discovered the jenkinsapi package and played around with it to see if it would give me the ability to drill down to the build and resultset level within Jenkins.

In the builds that I run, there are X number of sub-jobs. Each of these sub-jobs can pass or fail. If one of them fails, the entire build is marked with the color yellow and tagged as “UNSTABLE”, which is failed in my book. I want a way to track which of these sub-jobs is failing and how often over a time period. Some of these jobs can be unstable because they access network resources, which others may have been broken by a recent commit to the code base.

I eventually came up with some code that helps me figure out some of this information. But before you can dive into the code, you will need to install a package. Continue reading Getting Jenkins Jobs by Build State with Python

PyDev of the Week: Tyler Reddy

This week we welcome Tyler Reddy (@Tyler_Reddy) as our PyDev of the Week! Tyler is a core developer of Scipy and Numpy. He has also worked on the MDAnalysis library, which is for particle physics simulation analysis. If you’re interested in seeing some of his contributions, you can check out his Github profile. Let’s spend some time getting to know Tyler better!

Tyler Reddy

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

I grew up in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada and stayed there until my late twenties. My Bachelor and PhD degrees were both in biochemistry, focused on structural biology. I did travel a lot for chess, winning a few notable tournaments in my early teen years and achieving a master rating in Canada by my late teens. Dartmouth is also known as the “City of Lakes,” and I grew up paddling on the nearby Lake Banook. In the cold Canadian Winter the lake would freeze over and training would switch to a routine including distance running—this is where my biggest “hobby” really took off. I still run about 11 miles daily in the early morning.

I did an almost six year post-doc in Oxford, United Kingdom. I had started to realize during my PhD that my skill set was better suited to computational work than work on the lab bench. Formally, I was still a biol- ogist while at Oxford, but it was becoming clear that my contributions were starting to look a lot more like applied computer science and computational geometry in particular. I was recruited to Los Alamos National Labora- tory to work on viruses (the kind that make a person, not computer, sick), but ultimately my job has evolved into applied computer scientist here, and nothing beats distance running in beautiful Santa Fe, NM. Continue reading PyDev of the Week: Tyler Reddy

Letting Users Change a wx.ComboBox’s Contents in wxPython

This week I came across someone who was wondering if there was a way to allow the user to edit the contents of a wx.ComboBox. By editing the contents, I mean change the names of the pre-existing choices that the ComboBox contains, not adding new items to the widget.

While editing the contents of the selected item in a ComboBox works out of the box, the widget will not save those edits automatically. So if you edit something and then choose a different option in the ComboBox, the edited item will revert back to whatever it was previously and your changes will be lost.

Let’s find out how you can create a ComboBox that allows this functionality! Continue reading Letting Users Change a wx.ComboBox’s Contents in wxPython

Top 10 Most Read Mouse vs Python Articles of 2019

2019 was a good year for my blog. While we didn’t end up getting a lot of new readers, we did receive a small bump. There has also been a lot more interest in the books that are available on this site.

For the year 2019, these are the top ten most read:

Note that none of these articles were actually written in 2019. Half of them were written in 2018 and one of them dates all the way back to 2010. Interestingly enough, my most popular article of 2019 is about using Python to take a photo of the black hole. That article ranks way down at #28.

For 2020, I am going to work hard at creating new content and tutorials that you will find useful in your Python journey. In the meantime, I hope you’ll enjoy reading the archives while I work on some new ones!

PyDev of the Week: Bryan Weber

This week we welcome Bryan Weber (@darthbith) as our PyDev of the Week! Bryan is a contributor for Real Python and a core developer for Cantera. If you’d like to learn more about Bryan, you can check out his website or his Github profile. Let’s take a few moment to get to know him better!

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

I am a teaching professor at the University of Connecticut, as well as the Director of Undergraduate Studies for Mechanical Engineering. This means that I focus mostly on improving the education of our undergraduate students. I teach a lot of thermodynamics and fluid mechanics courses, and I’ve developed a few Python packages to help with that.

I got my doctorate in Mechanical Engineering in 2014, also from the University of Connecticut. One of my favorite things about mechanical engineering is that it is a super broad field, covering everything from robotics to chemistry, cars and trucks to planes and rockets, and everything in between.

My hobbies are open source software, Ultimate Frisbee, and cooking. I have a daughter and I love spending time as a family. Aside from that, there isn’t much time for anything else! Continue reading PyDev of the Week: Bryan Weber

PyDev of the Week: Saul Pwanson

This week we welcome Saul Pwanson (@saulfp) as our PyDev of the Week! Saul is the creator of VisiData, an interactive multitool for tabular data. If you’d like to see what Saul has been up to, then you should check out his website or his Github profile. You can also support Saul’s open source endeavors on Patreon. Let’s take a few moments to get to know Saul better!

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

I grew up in Chicagoland in the 80s, was on BBSes in the early 90s, and IRC in college and thereafter. I’ve been once to the Recurse Center in New York, twice to Holland, and six times to Bruno’s in Gerlach, NV. I like crossword puzzles, board games, and point-and-click adventures. One day I’d like to finish my “board simulation” of the awe-inspiring mechanics inside mitochondria. Continue reading PyDev of the Week: Saul Pwanson

PyDev of the Week: Kelly Schuster-Paredes

This week we welcome Kelly (@KellyPared) Schuster-Paredes. Kelly is the co-host of the popular Python podcast, Teaching Python. Kelly specializes in curriculum design and development. She blogs a bit over on her website which you should check out if you have the time.

For now though, let’s take a few moments to get to know Kelly better!

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

I am a Middle School Computer Science Teacher and a Technology Integration Specialist. I have been teaching for 23 years and have taught in the US, UK and in Peru. I have a Masters in Curriculum, Instruction and Technology, which means I know a lot about how to teach and invent cool lessons. Besides working and co-hosting Teaching Python, I spend most of my time with my two boys outside playing sports in the south Florida sun. Continue reading PyDev of the Week: Kelly Schuster-Paredes