Windows


Occasionally you will need to know what version of software you are using. The normal way to find this information out is usually done by opening the program, going to its Help menu and clicking the About menu item. But this is a Python blog and we want to do it programmatically! To do that on a Windows machine, we need PyWin32. In this article, we’ll look at two different methods of getting the version number of an application.

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Back in my system administrator days, we were thinking about setting the user’s Window desktop background to a specific image on login. Since I was in charge of the login scripts, which were written in Python, I decided to do some research to find out if there was a way to do it. We will look at two different approaches to this task in this article. The code in this article was tested using Python 2.7.8 and PyWin32 219 on Windows 7.

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I recently saw someone asking how to bring a window to the front in Windows and I realized I had had some old unreleased code that might help someone with this task. A long time ago, Tim Golden (and possibly some other fellows on the PyWin32 mailing list) showed me how to make windows come to the front on Windows XP, although it should be noted that it also works on Windows 7. If you’d like to follow along, you will need to download and install your own copy of PyWin32.

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Last month we looked at how to create Microsoft Excel (i.e. *.xls) files using the xlwt package. Today we will be looking at how we can read an *.xls/*.xlsx file using a package called xlrd. The xlrd package can be run on Linux and Mac as well as Windows. This is great when you need to process an Excel file on a Linux server.

We will start out by reading the first Excel file we created in our previous article.

Let’s get started! (more…)

Editor’s note: This is a guest post from Yasoob Khalid who authors the Free Python Tips blog

So hi there guys! I hope you are fine. So what is in this post? Today we will be writing a cleanup script. The idea for this post came from Mike Driscoll who recently wrote a very useful post about writing a cleanup script in python. So how is my post different from his post? (more…)

The other day I was trying to figure out a way to monitor the print queue on Windows. The task at hand was to keep track of what documents went to the printer and completely successfully. The idea was that when the print completed, the document would then be archived. To do this sort of thing, you need PyWin32 (AKA: Python for Windows extensions). In this article, we’ll look at a simple script that checks the print queue. (more…)

Python is pretty easy to install on Windows, but sometimes you need to do a few extra tweaks to really get the most our your development environment. In this article, we will try to cover all the common things you might want to do or install to get an ideal Python Windows development workspace set up. Some of you might think that all you need to do is install Python and you’re done, but if you’re going to do Windows development, then you’ll need a few other packages to make it nicer. (more…)

TurboGears is one of several web frameworks for Python that are available. The most popular by far is Django. Where I work, we chose TurboGears because of its integration with SQLAlchemy which supports composite keys. At that time, Django did not support that feature and I am not sure if it does yet. Anyway, I develop almost exclusively on a Windows box and have found the TurboGears’ documentation on the subject a little confusing. So here’s how I do it.

Note: We’ll be using TurboGears 2.1 in this tutorial (more…)

Last week, there was an interesting thread on the PyWin32 mailing list about how to read Microsoft Access databases with Python without having Access actually installed. Vernon Cole had the solution, but I noticed that Google doesn’t seem to index the PyWin32 list very well, so I decided to write about it here. (more…)

A couple of months ago at work, we received a report that a file was locked. The dialog that appeared showed the initials of a user who wasn’t even working for us any more. Thus we discovered an annoying bug that can crop up with Office. Basically, a user is asked by Word or Excel to input their name and initials during the first run of that respective application and it will keep that data no matter who logs into the machine later on. This can lead to some serious confusion when we get error messages of this sort. Anyway, let’s take a quick look at how to get this done. (more…)

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