Entries tagged with “Windows”.


I haven’t done a weekly round-up of Python links because no one seemed to really care when I was doing those. However I thought I’d give it one more try and see if there was any interest this time around. This past week, I finished reading my first web2py cookbook. I’m told there’s another book too, but I haven’t checked it out yet. I suspect had I read the other one first, the cookbook would have made more sense. If you’ve been a regular reader of this site, you’ll notice I’ve done several other book reviews the last couple of weeks too. Speaking of reading, here are just a few of the articles that stuck out to me this week:

I don’t want to overload you on links and I know this one is older, but I have been really interesting in following Katie C’s gaming adventures. So I’ll leave you on that note. I hope you enjoy the articles as much as I did.

Python is pretty easy to install on Windows, but sometimes you need to do a few extra tweaks to really get the most our your development environment. In this article, we will try to cover all the common things you might want to do or install to get an ideal Python Windows development workspace set up. Some of you might think that all you need to do is install Python and you’re done, but if you’re going to do Windows development, then you’ll need a few other packages to make it nicer. (more…)

A couple of months ago at work, we received a report that a file was locked. The dialog that appeared showed the initials of a user who wasn’t even working for us any more. Thus we discovered an annoying bug that can crop up with Office. Basically, a user is asked by Word or Excel to input their name and initials during the first run of that respective application and it will keep that data no matter who logs into the machine later on. This can lead to some serious confusion when we get error messages of this sort. Anyway, let’s take a quick look at how to get this done. (more…)

Update (10/12/2010) – One of my alert readers told me that SqlAlchemy 0.6.x currently does NOT support the Access dialect. Read here for more info.

A year or two ago, I was asked to transfer some data from some old Microsoft Access files to our Microsoft SQL Server. Since I enjoy using SqlAlchemy, I decided to see if it supported Access. The documentation at the time was pretty unhelpful in this regard, but it did seem to be possible and I found one thread about it on SqlAlchemy’s Google group. (more…)

After about a year or so at my current job, as we were still working on upgrading the last few Windows 98 machines to Windows XP, we had a need to check which machines on our network were getting low on disk space. The issue was cropping up because we had Windows XP loaded on several machines that had 10 GB hard drives and a few with 20 GB and one or two with just 4 GB. Anyway, after some digging online, I discovered that the PyWin32 package could accomplish what I needed. (more…)

In our previous article on building binaries, we learned a little about py2exe. This time around, we will be focusing our collective attention on the ins and outs of PyInstaller. We’ll use the same lame wxPython script from the last article for one of our examples, but we’ll also try a normal console script to see what the differences are, if any. In case you didn’t know, PyInstaller works on Linux, Windows and Mac (experimental) and works with Python 1.5-2.6 (except on Windows, where there’s a caveat for 2.6 – see below). PyInstaller supports code-signing (Windows), eggs, hidden imports, single executable, single directory, and lots more! (more…)

The other day, there was a post on one of the mailing lists that I follow about accessing the Windows Event Logs. I thought that was an interesting topic, so I went looking for examples and found a pretty nice example on ActiveState. In this article, you’ll find out what I discovered. (more…)

Most typical users have used Microsoft Office. While Office may be the bane of tech support, we still have to deal with it. Python can be used to script (AKA automate) Office and make it easier for us or our users to use. It may not be as easy as recording a macro, but it’s close. For this article, you will learn how to use the PyWin32 module to access some of the Office programs and manipulate them with Python. Some forums say that you need to run PythonWin’s makepy utility on Microsoft Word (and Excel) before you can access Office applications. I don’t think I needed to do that to make it work though (at least, not with the 2007 version). However, PythonWin comes with the PyWin32, so if you do run into trouble, you can try it. (more…)

The other day, I received a request to create a script that could tell how long a Windows XP machine had been idle and to alert the user if it had been idle for a certain amount of time. I did a little research with Google and found a couple of ways to accomplish this feat. The only one I was able to get working was a ctypes example, so without further ado, let’s check it out! (more…)

Have you ever wanted to restart your Windows PC with out pressing Start, Shutdown or CTRL+ALT+DEL? What about restarting your annoying co-worker’s PC…the one who just doesn’t know when to shut up? Well, Python has the answer and this blog will tell you how to do it! (more…)