Category Archives: PyDevOfTheWeek

PyDev of the Week: Petr Viktorin

This week our PyDev of the Week is Petr Viktorin (@EnCuKou). Petr is the author of PEP 489 — Multi-phase extension module initialization and teaches Python for the local PyLadies in Czech Republic. You can some of what he’s up to via his Github page or on his website. Let’s take some time to get to know Petr better!

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

Sure!

I’m a Python programmer from Brno, Czech Republic. I studied at the Brno University of Technology, and for my master’s I switched to the University of Eastern Finland.

When I’m not programming, I enjoy playing board games with my friends, and sometimes go to an orienteering race (without much success).

Why did you start using Python?

At the university, I did coursework in languages like C, Java, and Lisp, but then I found Python and got hooked. It fit the way I think about programs, abstracted away most of the boring stuff, and makes it easy to keep the code understandable.

After I returned home from the university, I found a community that was starting to form around the language, and that’s probably what keeps me around the language now.

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PyDev of the Week: Lukasz Langa

This week we welcome Łukasz Langa (@llanga) as our PyDev of the Week! Łukasz is the author of PEP 443 — Single-dispatch generic functions. He also authors an interesting blog, although it’s not just a programming blog. You can see what Łukasz has been up to over on Github. Let’s take a few moments to get to know him better!

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

My first name is Łukasz which is an endless source of Unicode joy. I am a committer to Python since 2010, started out as a maintainer for configparser, nowadays working on the type hinting side of things. I like analog synthesizers, bicycles, and the Fallout game series. In my free time I’m helping Facebook embrace Python 3.

Why did you start using Python?

This is a bit embarrassing. It was Autumn 2004, I was studying Computing Science at Poznan University of Technology in Poland. I had trouble with some courses I took, namely Linear Algebra. A friend showed me some scripts he wrote in Ruby and some linear algebra library to check his results when solving homework assignments. I badly needed some reassurance so I got excited about this. Sadly, for some reason Ruby refused to install on my Windows XP box at the time.

As a test was scheduled for the very next day, I started looking for alternatives. I literally typed “ruby alternative” in Google and found Python that way. This installed cleanly and I quickly found a functional linalg library replacement. I can’t remember what it was anymore, this was before NumPy was a thing! Either way, I got hooked.

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PyDev of the Week: Michael Kennedy

This week we welcome Michael Kennedy (@mkennedy) as our PyDev of the Week! Michael is an author and speaker. He is also a Python and MongoDB enthusiast, and an entrepreneur. He is the host of the popular Talk Python To Me podcast as well as the new Python Bytes Podcast. In 2016, he founded the Talk Python Training program. He has an interesting blog that I think you’ll find illuminating. Let’s take some time to get to know Michael better!

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc)

Hey everyone. I’m one of the lucky people who got to make his hobby his job (like many of you I suspect). I love programming and technology. I wake up everyday thinking today is even a more amazing day to be a developer than yesterday.

I got into programming in college. First, it was just a minor subject area to fill some requirements for my math degree. Over time I got more and more into programming. It was actually a research project my senior year that forced me to do “real” programming (3D graphics on SGI mainframes in C++ and OpenGL). After a week or two I realized I liked programming more than my actual focus of math.

I ended up getting a master’s degree in Math before I dropped out of the PhD program to pursue a software career. It seemed super risky at the time. Looking back, it was a wise choice.

That’s my education. For hobbies I like active and adventurous things. Throughout highschool I raced motocross and have very fond memories of those times. I don’t race these days.

It may sound odd, but I feel those experiences at the racetrack actually prepared me well for a public role in the software field. It’s nerve wracking and somewhat scary to be on a podcast, give a presentation to 100’s of conference attendees, or deliver a training course on a topic for the first time. But, it’s nothing compared to your first attempt to clear the 40 foot triple jump.

Getting over the hesitation and fear of all of these surprisingly has the same steps. Over prepare, over practice, find the willpower to calm your inner voices, and go for it.

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PyDev of the Week: Lisa Roach

This week we welcome Lisa Roach as our PyDev of the Week! Lisa is one of the authors of PEP 526 – Syntax for Variable Annotations which is a part of Python 3.6. You can check out which FOSS projects Lisa is interested in over on Github. Let’s take a few moments to get you know Lisa better!

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

I’m originally from Cleveland, Ohio, and I went to Ohio University. After graduation in 2014 I moved to Silicon Valley and took a job with Cisco, where I do some interesting work with networking devices and Python. Right now I focus on developing Python applications that can run on containers on top of our routers and switches. The applications usually do some form of automation for the device, although my last project I did custom RIB table injections. For fun, I enjoy hiking and cycling on weekends, and I like to relax after work with some video games. My go to right now is Fallout 4.

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PyDev of the Week: Mark Haase

This week we welcome Mark Haase as our PyDev of the Week. Mark is the author of PEP 505 – None-aware operators. You can check out what projects Mark is interested in over on Github. He also has a programming blog that covers various programming topics. Let’s take some time getting to know Mark better!

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

As a child, I always loved building things, like Legos. I sketched designs for other projects that I daydreamed about building — a hang glider! — but as a kid I was obviously limited in terms of skills, tools, and resources. Nobody was going to hand me an arc-welder, after all.

I started programming when I was about 12 or 13. I learned BASIC first, then Java a couple years later. Programming didn’t have the same limitations as physical things. I didn’t need a whole workshop with tools and materials, just a computer and a compiler. I minored in Comp Sci in college (a mistake, in retrospect, I should have majored in it!) and managed to find a job as a programmer when I graduated it. It’s been my career for 10 years now.

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PyDev of the Week: Cameron Simpson

This week we welcome Cameron Simpson as our PyDev of the Week. Cameron is the co-author of PEP 418 – Add monotonic time, performance counter, and process time functions and the author of PEP 499 – python -m foo should bind sys.modules[‘foo’] in addition to sys.modules[‘__main__’]. He is also a core Python developer and enthusiast. You can check out some of his projects on bitbucket. Let’s take a few moments to get to know him better!

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

I’ve been a programming nerd since I was about 15, and I’ve got a BSc in Computer Science. I’m a somewhat lapsed climber and biker; I still have a motorcycle and try to use it but circumstances interfere; I’m trying to resume some indoor climbing too. I’m spending a fair amount of time on a small farm, and teleworking from there part of the time; I’ve been fortunate to find work where that is possible.

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PyDev of the Week: Oleg Broytman

This week we welcome Oleg Broytman (@phd_ru) as our PyDev of the Week. Oleg is the maintainer of the SQLObject project. According to their website “SQLObject is a popular Object Relational Manager for providing an object interface to your database, with tables as classes, rows as instances, and columns as attributes.“. You can also see what else Oleg is a part of via Github and his website. Let’s take a few moments to get to know Oleg better!

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

I was born in Central Asian part of Soviet Union. I relocated to Moscow, Russia to study computer science at CS department of Moscow State University. I started to program before IBM PC era, my first computers were Soviet clones of PDP-11 and IBM/360.

Outside of my professional job I spend a lot of time with computers taking parts in Free Software projects.

Other than that I live usual life spending time with my family, reading books, listening music, watching videos.

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PyDev of the Week: Ivan Levkivskyi

This week we welcome Ivan Levkivskyi (@ILevkivskyi) as our PyDev of the Week! Ivan is the author or coauthor of several Python Enhancement Proposals, specifically 483, 484 and 526. In other words, Ivan is one of the lead developers behind adding type hints to Python via the typing module. Ivan is a scientist and as such, he has written a lot of interesting research papers, which I will readily admit that they are over my head. You might also find his Github page interesting as he is involved in a lot of projects. Let’s take some time to get to know our fellow Pythonista better!

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

I work as a researcher in theoretical physics. I was more interested in mathematical physics in high school, but now I mostly interested in mesoscopic physics — area that investigates the boundaries between our macroscopic world and the quantum microscopic world. I have been learning physics for about 20 years and never had any CS education. Although, I should note that my rough familiarity with category theory helps me in the programming world.

Most of the time, programming was rather my hobby, only the last 5 years I have been programming for work. My first acquaintance with programming was learning x86 assembly at an age of 10. Then I played with other languages from time to time. And now I use Python a lot in my work, mostly for prototyping and number-crunching.

I am from Ukraine originally, but now live in Switzerland. Apart from physics and programming, I like mountain sports: hiking, rock climbing, ski touring, etc. Also I like listening to music a lot and I used to play accordion and bass.

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PyDev of the Week: Philip House

This week we welcome Philip House (@PhilipHouse2) as our PyDev of the Week! Philip is one of the authors behind PEP 526 – Syntax for Variable Annotations which was provisionally accepted into Python 3.6. Philip also writes a blog and is involved in the development of several 3rd party Python packages which you can check out on Github. Let’s take some time to get to know him better.

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

I graduated from Northwestern University in 2015 where I studied computer science for my degree program. During my time there, I was mainly interested in learning about how the web and distributed computing works. Some of my favorite work in undergrad was doing research on and building crowdsourcing and social computing systems. I was particularly curious about learnersourcing – solving problems with a crowd of motivated learners.

From internships and personal projects in college, I built up experience building web applications and data-intensive projects. When I graduated, I went to work as a platform software engineer where I worked with building API’s and highly available distributed services with a mixture of Python and Java.

I’m currently working on a startup with some former classmates in the industrial IoT space.

When I’m not sitting in front of a computer, I really enjoy camping with friends and playing old-school Gamecube games.

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PyDev of the Week: Jacob Vanderplas

This week we welcome Jacob Vanderplas (@jakevdp) as our PyDev of the Week! Jacob is the author of Python Data Science Handbook: Essential Tools for Working with Data and works at the University of Washington as a researcher and teacher. As you might have guessed from the title of his book, Jacob is very much in tune with the Scientific programming projects in Python. If you check out his github profile, you will find many interesting highlights on Scikit-learn, for example. Let’s take some time to get to know him better!

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

I’ve always been drawn to physical activity – I was a swimmer in high school and college, and post-college got into triathlons, culminating with an Ironman a few years back. I’m not as competition-driven these days, but the way I relax is to go out on long hikes, runs, swims, or bike rides. My favorite pastime is to head out on long trail-runs deep into the mountains, though I don’t make it out as much these days with a toddler at home!

I was born and raised in Palo Alto, majored in Physics at Calvin College and did my PhD in Astronomy at University of Washington. In between I lived for a year in Northern Japan, guided mountaineering excursions for two summers in the Sierra Nevada, and taught at a middle school outdoor science program for two years in the redwood forests above Santa Cruz – my experiences during those years and the people with whom I shared my time have had a profound impact on me, and I’m so grateful for the opportunities I’ve had!

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