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My latest project is turning my book, Python 101, into a Screencast. I have started a Kickstarter to raise funds to help in this endeavor. You can check it out here:

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/34257246/the-python-101-screencast

The basic idea is to take each chapter of the book and turn it into a screencast. There are 44 chapters currently that will be turned into mini-videos. I’ve already realized I can add a lot of other items in a screencast that are easier to show than to write about, so there will definitely be additional content. I hope you will join me in this project.

Thanks,
Mike

I am currently working on another Kickstarter campaign to turn my book, Python 101 into a video series. I am planning on launching this project on Wednesday, March 25th. There are 44 chapters in my book, so I’ll be creating a minimum of 44 screencast videos. Here is what is currently covered in the book and what will also be covered in the video series:

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Today we welcome Daniel Greenfeld (@pydanny) as our PyDev of the Week! He is the co-author of Two Scoops of Django. I have followed his blog for quite some time and it’s well worth reading. If you’re interested in what Mr. Greenfeld codes, you should check out his Github profile. Now let’s spend some time getting to know our fellow Pythoneer!

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This week, we welcome Eli Bendersky (@elibendersky) as our PyDev of the Week. I have enjoyed reading his blog over the years as he writes some pretty interesting articles on Python. You can see some of the projects he works on at github. Let’s spend a few minutes getting to know our fellow Pythoneer!

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For the rest of March, you can get my book, Python 101 for 50% off if you use the following code: march15

Learn how to program with Python from beginning to end. My book is made primarily for beginners. However, at least two-thirds of it is aimed at intermediate programmers. You may be wondering how that works. The book will be split into four parts.

Part One

The first part is the beginner section. In it you will learn all the basics of Python. From Python types (strings, lists, dictionaries) to conditional statements to loops. You will also learn about comprehensions, functions and classes and everything in between! Note: This section has been completed and is in the editing phase.

Part Two

This section will be a curated tour of the Python Standard Library. The intent isn’t to cover everything in it, but instead it is to show the reader that you can do a lot with Python right out of the box. We’ll be covering the modules I find the most useful in day-to-day programming tasks, such as os, sys, logging, threads, and more.

Part Three

This section is all intermediate level material. It covers the following:

  • lambda
  • decorators
  • properties
  • debugging
  • testing
  • profiling

Part Four

Now things get really interesting! In part four, we will be learning how to install 3rd party libraries (i.e. packages) from the Python Package Index and other locations. We will cover easy_install and pip. This section will also be a series of tutorials where you will learn how to use the packages you download. For example, you will learn how to download a file, parse XML, use an Object Relational Mapper to work with a database, etc.

Part Five

The last section of the book will cover how to share your code with your friends and the world! You will learn how to package it up and share it on the Python Package Index (i.e. how to create an egg or wheel). You will also learn how to create executables using py2exe, bb_freeze, cx_freeze and PyInstaller. Finally you will learn how to create an installer using Inno Setup.

This week we welcome Ned Batchelder (@nedbat) as our PyDev of the week. I have enjoyed Ned’s blog for quite some time. He is also the author of the coverage package and is quite active in several Python user groups. Let’s spend some time getting to know more about Ned!

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This week we welcome Bryan Oakley as our PyDev of the Week! I’ve met Bryan a few times in various Python-related forums and developer hangouts online. He’s a master at Tkinter and has answered a lot of questions about it (and Python) of StackOverflow and other places. I hope you will enjoy getting to know more about as much as I did.

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This week we welcome Maciej Fijalkowski (@fijall) as our PyDev of the Week. He is a freelance programmer who spends a lot of time working on the PyPy project. I would recommend checking out some of his work on github. Let’s spend some time learning about our fellow Pythonista!

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I see this come up from time to time where people will ask how to center a widget in a window. The solution is actually quite easy. In most cases, you just need to nest a Horizontal BoxSizer inside of a Verticel BoxSizer with some spacers. In this article, I’ll show you two three different ways to accomplish this task.

wx_centered

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I recently came across a fun little project called EasyGUI_Qt. It’s basically the same thing as EasyGUI except that it uses PyQt4 instead of Tkinter. The idea behind both of these packages is to allow the developer to ask the user simple questions using dialogs.

In this article, we’ll spend some time learning how to use this package by looking at a few examples. Note that EasyGUI_Qt works with both Python 2 and 3, although its primary target is Python 3. The documentation states that there may be some issues with unicode in Python 2, but other than that, the widgets should work fine.

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