Category Archives: Books

Books that I’ve read, reviewed or cited for this article

PyDev of the Week: Peter Farrell

This week we welcome Peter Farrell (@hackingmath) as our PyDev of the Week! Peter is the author Math Adventures with Python and two other math related Python books. You can learn more about Peter by visiting his website.

Let’s take a few moments to get to know Peter!

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

I was brought up in the US, earned a B.A. in Math and taught Math for 8 years in big and small schools. I always wanted to show students the real-world applications of the stuff they were learning, all of which turned out to be computer-related. I learned to program in my 30’s in Logo by going page-by-page through Samuel Papert’s brilliant book Mindstorms. After that I taught all my math classes turtle programming. A student turned me on to Python and I never looked back. Away from the computer, I like to play guitar and watch documentaries. Continue reading PyDev of the Week: Peter Farrell

wxPython – Creating a PDF Merger / Splitter Utility

The Portable Document Format (PDF) is a well-known format popularized by Adobe. It purports to create a document that should render the same across platforms.

Python has several libraries that you can use to work with PDFs:

  • ReportLab – Creating PDFs
  • PyPDF2 – Manipulating preexisting PDFs
  • pdfrw – Also for manipulating preexisting PDFs, but also works with ReportLab
  • PDFMiner – Extracts text from PDFs

There are several more Python PDF-related packages, but those four are probably the most well known. One common task of working with PDFs is the need for merging or concatenating multiple PDFs into one PDF. Another common task is taking a PDF and splitting out one or more of its pages into a new PDF.

You will be creating a graphical user interface that does both of these tasks using PyPDF2. Continue reading wxPython – Creating a PDF Merger / Splitter Utility

Lucid Programming Podcast – Writing Books About Python

I was recently interviewed on the Lucid Programming Podcast by Vincent Russo about writing books about Python.

You can listen to the audio here:

If you’d like to know more about how I write books, you might enjoy this article I wrote on the topic. I also wrote an article on the Pros and Cons of Indy Publishing.

Last week, I was honored to be on the Profitable Python podcast.


Related Podcasts

Other podcasts I have been on:

PyDev of the Week: Eric Matthes

This week we welcome Eric Matthes (@ehmatthes) as our PyDev of the Week! Eric is the author of the popular book, Python Crash Course. He also created a neat set of Python Flash Cards that I reviewed earlier this year. You can catch up with Eric on his website or check out some of his work on Github.

Let’s take a few moments to get to know Eric better!

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

Sure! I grew up in southern New Hampshire, on the outskirts of Boston in the early 1980s. My father was a software engineer at DEC around that time, and I first learned to program on a kit computer in our basement back then. I am so grateful to my father for sharing the technology he had at home, instead of telling me to keep away from it all. It has been amazing to watch computers evolve from the early days of almost no one having a home computer to almost everyone having multiple computers in their lives.

I loved math and science in high school, and I went into undergrad as a chemical engineering major because I loved AP Chemistry. But I soon found that engineering was really about learning to solve other people’s problems. I enjoyed my physics classes though, because they were all about understanding the universe, from the very large to the very small. For a while I naively worried that if I stayed with physics long enough I’d start to find the world less interesting as I understood it on a deeper level. It was a joy to discover that the opposite was true: the more I learned, the more fascinating everything around me became.

I continued to learn new programming languages throughout my educational experiences. I took a variety of programming classes, and always had a few projects going for fun. I wrote a 3d graphing program in C during spring break one year in college.

I wanted to be a particle physicist, but I didn’t want to be a student forever. I decided to try teaching for a couple years, and quickly found that the intellectual challenge of trying to reach every student in my classes was just as satisfying as doing hard science. I loved teaching, and decided to stay with it.

In 2011 my son was born, and a month later my father died. It was a really hard time, but it was also a formative experience for me. My mother asked me to look through my father’s computer and let her know if there was anything worth saving. It was a really intimate experience, looking through all the projects he was working on, and reading through his notes. I used to visit him in his office whenever I went home, and as long as his computer was open and running that day I still felt directly connected to him. It was sad to realize these projects would never be finished, and would never be used by anyone. In the weeks that followed I realized that if I died you’d find a bunch of half-finished projects on my computer as well. I made a commitment to start using the skills I’d learned to build something meaningful.

I wanted to build tools that would bring greater equity to public education. I gave a talk at PyCon 2013 about how much the educational world could gain from the open source model, and Bill Pollock of No Starch Press approached me afterwards. “I hope you build what you described, and if you ever want to write a technical book let me know.” I went back to my classroom and saw a poster hanging on my wall: “What’s the least you need to know about programming in order to start building meaningful projects?” It was a list I had made for my students of the smallest set of things they needed to know in order to be able to build the things they cared about like games, data visualizations, and simple web apps. I realized that was the book I wanted to write, and the question on that poster became the guiding question for Python Crash Course. I hadn’t intended to write a book, but I realized that in five years of trying to teach programming to high school students, all the resources I found were either aimed at young kids, or assumed more technical knowledge and experience than my students had. I decided to write a book for anyone old enough to not want a kids book. It has been immensely satisfying to see that Python Crash Course works for almost everyone in that anticipated audience: young kids motivated enough to want a more serious book, high school students, undergrads in all majors, grad students, working adults, and retired people who are curious to learn programming at an older age. I was surprised to find it even works well for people who are already fluent in another language, and want to pick up Python quickly. Continue reading PyDev of the Week: Eric Matthes

Summer Python Book Sale

It’s summer time and now is a great time to learn Python! To help with that, I am running a sale of my Python books for the next week. The sale ends August 6th. All books are $9.99-$14.99 on Leanpub!

All My Python Books


Creating GUI Applications with wxPython

Creating GUI Applications with wxPython is my latest book. In it you will learn how to create cross-platform desktop applications using wxPython. Use this link or click the image above to get a discount.


Jupyter Notebook 101

The Jupyter Notebook is a great teaching tool and it’s a fun way to use and learn Python and data science. I wrote a nice introductory book on the topic called Jupyter Notebook 101.


ReportLab – PDF Processing with Python

Creating and manipulating PDFs with Python is fun! In ReportLab – PDF Processing with Python you will learn how to create PDFs using the ReportLab package. You will also learn how to manipulate pre-existing PDFs using PyPDF2 and pdfrw as well as a few other handy PDF-related Python packages.


Python 201: Intermediate Python

Python 201: Intermediate Python

Python 201: Intermediate Python is a sequel to my first book, Python 101 and teaches its readers intermediate to advanced topics in Python.

PyDev of the Week: David Kopec

This week we welcome David Kopec (@davekopec) as our PyDev of the Week! David is the author of Classic Computer Science Problems in Python from Manning, as well as several other books. He was even interviewed about his book by Talk Python! If you would like to see what open source projects he is working on, then you should head on over to Github. Now let’s take some time to get to know David!

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc)?

Before I start, I want to thank Mike for including me in this series. It’s an honor.

I’m an assistant professor in the Computer Science & Innovation program at Champlain College in beautiful Burlington, Vermont, USA. Before becoming a full time professor, I worked professionally as a software developer, and I’m still open to taking projects on a consulting basis. I have a bachelors degree in economics (minor in English) from Dartmouth College and a masters degree in computer science, also from Dartmouth.

I’m the author of three programming books: Dart for Absolute Beginners (Apress, 2014), Classic Computer Science Problems in Swift (Manning, 2018), and Classic Computer Science Problems in Python (Manning, 2019). However, I no longer recommend the Dart book because it’s very outdated. I’m also an active contributor to open source.

When I’m not working, I enjoy learning about American history, entrepreneurship, and keeping up with the world of computing (although that’s kind of my job too). I also have all the same hobbies that just about everyone has—cooking, traveling, film, reading (classics, biography, history, business dramas), television (Frasier & The Curse of Oak Island!), music, video games (Zelda & AOE2!), podcasts, stock trading, etc. Continue reading PyDev of the Week: David Kopec

Book Contest: Creating GUI Applications with wxPython

Last month, I released a new book entitled Creating GUI Applications with wxPython. In celebration of a successful launch, I have decided to do a little contest.

Cover art for Creating GUI Applications with wxPython

Rules

  • Tweet about the contest and include my handle: @driscollis
  • Send me a direct message on Twitter or via my contact form with a link to your Tweet
  • If you don’t have Twitter, feel free to message me through the website and I’ll enter you anyway

The contest will run starting now until Friday, June 21st @ 11:59 p.m. CST.

Runners up will receive a free copy of the eBook. The grand prize will be a signed paperback copy + the eBook version!

Book Review: Practical Python and OpenCV

I bought Practical Python and OpenCV a couple of years ago during one of its authors Kickstarters. I started reading it and then got busy with other things. The past couple of weeks, I decided to give the book another go and was able to finish it. Note that I started reading the 3rd edition of the book without realizing there was a 4th edition. After finished the 3rd edition, I compared it to the 4th side by side and it looks like they are nearly identical, so I don’t think it matters all that much.


Quick Review

  • Why I picked it up: Computer vision / machine learning sounds interesting to me and the author has a fun blog
  • Why I finished it: It’s short and the writing style is engaging
  • I’d give it to: Anyone looking to get started with OpenCV in Python

Continue reading Book Review: Practical Python and OpenCV

PyDev of the Week: Sean McManus

This week we welcome Sean McManus (@musicandwords) as our PyDev of the Week! Sean is the author of several books, including Mission Python: Code a Space Adventure Game!, which was reviewed on this site in March. There are free chapters from his book available here. You can learn more about Sean on his website. Let’s take some time to get to know him better!

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

I’m a writer specialising in technology. In recent years I’ve written several books to get children and young adults into coding. The launch of the Raspberry Pi and initiatives such as Code Club have helped to make coding much more accessible to young people than it was for many years.

As a kid, I loved programming my Amstrad CPC computer and in many ways it started me on my career path. I had listings and articles published in the leading magazines of the day, and my first book was about Amstrad programming. Today, I can still remember how much I loved programming as a kid, and I hope that my books bring some of that excitement to today’s budding coders.

As well as writing books and articles, I help some of the world’s leading technology companies with their copywriting requirements.

Outside of writing, I enjoy photography and making music. I have recorded an album of electronic music I plan to release online later this year, and I am a member of a singing group which is a great way to unwind. Continue reading PyDev of the Week: Sean McManus

Creating GUI Applications with wxPython Now Available

My latest book, Creating GUI Applications with wxPython is now available for purchase.

Cover art for Creating GUI Applications with wxPython

Creating GUI Applications with wxPython is a book that will teach you how to use wxPython to create applications by actually creating several mini-programs. I have found that while learning how the various widgets work in wxPython is valuable, it is even better to learn by creating a simple application that does something useful.

In this book, you will be creating the following applications:

  • A simple image viewer
  • A database viewer
  • A database editor
  • Calculator
  • An Archiving application (tar)
  • PDF Merging application
  • XML Editor
  • File search utility
  • Simple FTP application
  • NASA Image downloader

As you learn how to create these applications, you will also learn how wxPython works. You will go over how wxPython’s event system works, how to use threads in wxPython, make use of sizers and much, much more!

The eBook version is on sale on Leanpub for $14.99 until May 15th. You can also purchase the book on Gumroad, or get the paperback or Kindle version on Amazon.