Entries tagged with “Python”.


I don’t do a lot of plotting in my job, but I recently heard about a website called Plotly that provides a plotting service for anyone’s data. They even have a plotly package for Python (among others)! So in this article we will be learning how to plot with their package. Let’s have some fun making graphs!

(more…)

This week we have Werner Bruhin as our PyDev of the Week! He’s quite busy on the wxPython Google Group helping people get into wxPython as well as creating patches for the wxPython toolkit. Let’s find out more about our fellow Python programmer! (more…)

One of my readers suggested that I should try logging my data to a web service called Loggly. As I understand it, Loggly is a way to share log data with everyone in a business so that you no longer need to log in to individual machines. They also provide graphs, filters and searches of the logs. They don’t have a Python API, but it’s still pretty easy to send data to Loggly via Pythons urllib2 module and simplejson. Also note that you can use Loggly for 30-day trial period.

(more…)

Occasionally you will need to know what version of software you are using. The normal way to find this information out is usually done by opening the program, going to its Help menu and clicking the About menu item. But this is a Python blog and we want to do it programmatically! To do that on a Windows machine, we need PyWin32. In this article, we’ll look at two different methods of getting the version number of an application.

(more…)

Back in my system administrator days, we were thinking about setting the user’s Window desktop background to a specific image on login. Since I was in charge of the login scripts, which were written in Python, I decided to do some research to find out if there was a way to do it. We will look at two different approaches to this task in this article. The code in this article was tested using Python 2.7.8 and PyWin32 219 on Windows 7.

(more…)

I was looking through some of my old code and noticed this old script where I was creating a log of all running processes every 5 minutes. I believe I originally wrote the code to help me diagnose rogue processes that were eating memory or pegging the CPU. I was using the psutil project to get the information I needed, so if you’d like to follow along you will need to download and install it as well.

(more…)

I recently saw someone asking how to bring a window to the front in Windows and I realized I had had some old unreleased code that might help someone with this task. A long time ago, Tim Golden (and possibly some other fellows on the PyWin32 mailing list) showed me how to make windows come to the front on Windows XP, although it should be noted that it also works on Windows 7. If you’d like to follow along, you will need to download and install your own copy of PyWin32.

(more…)

This week we have Facundo Batista (@facundobatista) joining us.

facundobatista

He is a Python Core developer from Argentina. If you happen to speak Spanish, then you might enjoy his blog. Let’s spend some time getting to know Facundo! (more…)

The PyDev of the Week this week is Ben Rousch (@brousch). He is a contributor to the Kivy project. You should check out his blog here. You can also see Mr. Rousch give a talk about Kivy on Youtube. Let’s find out more about him! (more…)

There are several 3rd party packages that wrap Twitter’s API. We’ll be looking at tweepy and twitter. The tweepy documentation is a bit more extensive than twitter’s, but I felt that the twitter package had more concrete examples. Let’s spend some time going over how to use these packages! (more…)