Python 101 Book Published Today!

Posted by Mike on June 3rd, 2014 filed in Books, Education, Python

My first book, Python 101 has been published today. You can buy it directly from my blog which will get you a PDF, EPUB and MOBI version of the book. You can also purchase a softcover edition of the book via Lulu. Finally, I have published the eBook to Amazon.

If you happen to run a Python or technology blog and would be interested in reviewing my book, Python 101, please feel free to contact me with your blog’s information. I am looking for a few good bloggers to review the book.

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Here’s some more information about the book:

Part One

The first part is the beginner section. In it you will learn all the basics of Python. From Python types (strings, lists, dictionaries) to conditional statements to loops. You will also learn about comprehensions, functions and classes and everything in between! Note: This section has been completed and is in the editing phase.

Part Two

This section will be a curated tour of the Python Standard Library. The intent isn’t to cover everything in it, but instead it is to show the reader that you can do a lot with Python right out of the box. We’ll be covering the modules I find the most useful in day-to-day programming tasks, such as os, sys, logging, threads, and more.

Part Three

This section covers mostly intermediate level material. Here are the topics covered:

  • lambda
  • decorators
  • properties
  • debugging
  • testing
  • profiling

Part Four

Now things get really interesting! In part three, we will be learning how to install 3rd party libraries (i.e. packages) from the Python Package Index and other locations. We will cover easy_install and pip. This section will also be a series of tutorials where you will learn how to use the packages you download. For example, you will learn how to download a file, parse XML, use an Object Relational Mapper to work with a database, etc.

Part Five

The last section of the book will cover how to share your code with your friends and the world! You will learn how to package it up and share it on the Python Package Index (i.e. how to create an egg or wheel). You will also learn how to create executables using py2exe, bb_freeze, cx_freeze and PyInstaller. Finally you will learn how to create an installer using Inno Setup.

Writing Style

This book will be written using my original blogging style. This means that the chapters will be shorter than your usual programming textbook. Most chapters will most likely be less than 10 pages! The idea here is to get the reader up to speed on the subject, not to beat them over the head with it.
Who should read this book?

This book is for beginners, but I believe people with intermediate skills will also find its contents valuable.

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  • Eric

    Congratulations!

  • Jose Antonio Hernandez C.

    Congrats! I bought the paperback and Kindle versions… woohoo.

  • Ooo

    any sample or free chapter?

  • craigaddyman

    Got myself a copy. Read first few chapters last night, so far so good!

  • Ben

    Which version of Python is this aimed at?

  • http://www.blog.pythonlibrary.org/ Mike Driscoll

    It’s aimed primarily at Python 3

  • http://www.blog.pythonlibrary.org/ Mike Driscoll

    Thanks! I’m glad you like it!

  • Kurt

    can buyers of the paperback download the code or do the need to buy the pdf too, if the do want to type all code

  • http://www.blog.pythonlibrary.org/ Mike Driscoll

    The code isn’t on the website yet, but I plan to add it as soon as I can. It will be available to everyone, paperback or ebook. Thanks!

  • http://www.blog.pythonlibrary.org/ Mike Driscoll

    Thanks!

  • http://www.blog.pythonlibrary.org/ Mike Driscoll

    You should be able to preview the first 15 pages on Lulu here: http://www.lulu.com/shop/michael-driscoll/python-101/paperback/product-21657364.html

  • bha100710

    Congratulations !!

    Part 3 and Part 5 look very promising given my current python skills :)

    Added to my soon ‘to-read’ list.

  • kutpaste123

    I picked the book and went through the first section thus far & love the simplistic explanantions. I would like to see the code posted somewhere so I can better test & also more info on the dunder methods if possible. Also could you add a forum to this book where everyone (novice, intermediate, advanced) could collaborate

  • http://www.blog.pythonlibrary.org/ Mike Driscoll

    I will be adding the code examples to the website this month. I’ve been really busy the last couple of weeks moving and changing jobs, so I’m a bit behind on my schedule. Sorry about that! I’ll look into what it would take to add a forum too.

  • Stockman

    Can’t the code be on GitHub or BitBucket … It may be more convenient for cloning or …

    Great book. kudo.

  • http://www.blog.pythonlibrary.org/ Mike Driscoll

    That sounds like a good idea to me. I think I’ll do that. Thanks!

  • craigaddyman

    Your explaination of lamda needs work. It’s not clear at all.