Entries tagged with “Python Web Frameworks”.


Last night I received an email about a new Python-related Kickstarter. The Real Python crew added a new author to write a book entirely about Django 1.6. This is a subject that I keep meaning to get into and haven’t had the opportunity to do so. Hopefully by backing this project, I’ll finally learn Django.

I have been impressed with the quality of their previous projects, so I feel that I can safely endorse these authors. I’m sure the project will be of high quality and well worth your time and money. Plus it’s fun to support these guys who want to share their knowledge. If you’re interested in supporting the project you can go to the following address:

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/721054906/real-python-advanced-web-development-featuring-dja

Note: They are already fully funded at this point and some of the support levels are already full, so if you want to get in early, now is the time!

In this article we will be taking the code from the previous article on Bottle and changing it such that it uses SQLAlchemy instead of just normal SQLite code. This will require you to download the bottle-sqlalchemy package from PyPI. You can also install it using “pip install bottle-sqlalchemy”, assuming you have pip installed. You will also need Bottle itself, of course. Once you’re ready, we can continue. (more…)

Python has lots of web frameworks. Bottle is one of them and is considered a WSGI Framework. It’s also sometimes called a “micro-framework”, probably because Bottle consists of just one Python file and has no dependencies besides Python itself. I’ve been trying to learn it and I was using the official Todo-list tutorial on their website. In this article, we’re going to go over this application and improve the UI a little bit. Then in a separate follow-up article, we’ll change the application to use SQLAlchemy instead of straight sqlite. You will probably want to go install Bottle if you’d like to follow along. (more…)

I haven’t done a weekly round-up of Python links because no one seemed to really care when I was doing those. However I thought I’d give it one more try and see if there was any interest this time around. This past week, I finished reading my first web2py cookbook. I’m told there’s another book too, but I haven’t checked it out yet. I suspect had I read the other one first, the cookbook would have made more sense. If you’ve been a regular reader of this site, you’ll notice I’ve done several other book reviews the last couple of weeks too. Speaking of reading, here are just a few of the articles that stuck out to me this week:

I don’t want to overload you on links and I know this one is older, but I have been really interesting in following Katie C’s gaming adventures. So I’ll leave you on that note. I hope you enjoy the articles as much as I did.

TurboGears is one of several web frameworks for Python that are available. The most popular by far is Django. Where I work, we chose TurboGears because of its integration with SQLAlchemy which supports composite keys. At that time, Django did not support that feature and I am not sure if it does yet. Anyway, I develop almost exclusively on a Windows box and have found the TurboGears’ documentation on the subject a little confusing. So here’s how I do it.

Note: We’ll be using TurboGears 2.1 in this tutorial (more…)

This week’s Python news covers new modules, updates to old modules, a newish Python Magazine (no, not that one!), an update on what’s going on with the new wxPython and more!

  • TurboGears Joins the Pylons Project” (Alt title: TurboGears Becomes TurboPyramid). I think the title says it all…and no, they didn’t really rename the project.
  • wxPython’s “Project Phoenix” gets an update – this gives an update on how Robin Dunn is moving away from SWIG to make it easier to do documentation and the Python 3 port.
  • Michael Foord’s new “e” module makes a debut…read all about it on his blog
  • PET: Issue #1 – English translation of a magazine created by the Argentina Python Users Group. Yes, this is kind of old news, but I thought it was really cool and it needs YOUR support!
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  • The PSF blog talks about high schoolers using Python to program robots under the guidance of Vern Ceder
  • PyCrypto gets a Python 3 port courtesy of Thorsten Behrens. Check out the thread and download your copy to help find any bugs!

That’s it for this week. Next time we’ll be in 2011! That’s amazing! Anyway, I hope you have a nice holiday and you’ll let me know of any Python news that I should talk about for the next post. Thanks!